Snapshots From My Herb’n Homestead

Tree-Circle
April is now a happy memory and May is just beginning to show her colors. Spring this year has been an on-again-off-again adventure. Here in Fort Worth (and many other parts of the country) we have been dealing with temperature changes as much as 40-50 degrees from one day to another. It’s no wonder that some of our garden plants got a little confused. But back to my garden. There’s so much to see I decided to just post photos with a bit of commentary. Welcome to my spring garden.

 

 

Mealy blue sage is a Southwest native that blooms for several months. To the left is winter savory, which will bloom in mid summer.

Mealy blue sage (Salvia farinacea) is a Southwest native that blooms for several months. I just love those blue spikes. They can be clipped and enjoyed indoors with other spring flowers. To the left is winter savory, a much underused herb, which will bloom later in mid summer.

 

 

I love to have a pot of peppermint on the kitchen porch. I often pull of a small sprig and chew it for the flavor. Fresh peppermint is a geat addition to a tall glass of iced tea.

I love to have a pot of peppermint on the kitchen porch. I often pull of a small sprig and chew it for the flavor. Fresh peppermint is a geat addition to a tall glass of iced tea.

 

 

The young rose scented geranium in the front of this pot came up from last years root ball that overwintered on our porch. The young herbs in the back of the pot are chervil, something I haven't grown in several years. Chervil is more commonly used in French cuisine than here in America.

The young rose scented geranium in the front of this pot came up from last years root ball that overwintered on our porch. With proper care most scented geraniums can survive the winter. The young herbs in the back of the pot are chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium), something I haven’t grown in several years. Chervil is more commonly used in French cuisine than here in America. It can be added to food in the same way you would use parsley, a close cousin.

 

 

Cilantro (center of photo) can only be grown in Texas during the cooler months of the year. This young plant is surrounded by soapwort with Greek oregano around the edges.

Cilantro (center of photo) can only be grown in Texas and the Southwest during the cooler months of the year. Once daytime temperatures exceed 90 degrees, it bolts and goes to seed, then dies. This young cilantro is surrounded by soapwort with Greek oregano peeking in around the edges.

 

 

Not eveerything is as tidy as I'd like. Here you see Berggarten sage invaded by variegated artemisia. Time to dig it up and replant.

Not everything is as tidy as I’d like in my garden. Here you see Berggarten sage (the blue-green leaves) invaded by variegated artemesia. Time to dig it up and replant.

 

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